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daily sketching part five

It’s been nearly 2 months since I last posted some of my sketches. Wow, where has the time gone. We are half way through the year. Can you believe it? It’s summer, that means it’s lighter for longer. I’m still trying to do some sketching every day but sometimes I default and then do more the next day. I figure that I can let myself odd the hook. It’s been 6 months since I started this journey and I’ve got quite a bit to show for it, wouldn’t you agree?

For new readers, here are some more of my older sketches.

My fascination with dense housing and cityscapes continues and I’m forever looking to improve.

daily sketching part five | colourliving

daily sketching part five | colourliving

daily sketching part five | colourliving

I spent a day at a hospital with a dear friend who had keyhole surgery on his knee. What else to do but take my sketchbook and sketching utensils. This was more of a doodle. I really was there to take care of my friend and not obsess about some complex and intricate design. The nurses were most fascinated….

daily sketching part five | colourliving

daily sketching part five | colourliving

daily sketching part five | colourliving

At the hospital I saw something about glass eyes that inspired this following sketch. A bit eerie now I’ve told you?

daily sketching part five | colourliving

daily sketching part five | colourliving

daily sketching part five | colourliving

Back to some flowers. They always pop up somewhere and I so enjoy sketching them.

daily sketching part five | colourliving

daily sketching part five | colourliving

daily sketching part five | colourliving

A cityscape in some more muted tones.

daily sketching part five | colourliving

daily sketching part five | colourliving

daily sketching part five | colourliving

An imaginary forest. I did an embroidery of this many years ago so fancied having a go with markers instead of stitching.

daily sketching part five | colourliving

daily sketching part five | colourliving

daily sketching part five | colourliving

There seems to be rainbows EVERYWHERE on social media. I somehow wanted to join in…

daily sketching part five | colourliving

daily sketching part five | colourliving

daily sketching part five | colourliving

daily sketching part five | colourliving

My imaginary gallery. I’m not good at figure drawing, but fancied a little challenge. Here I went over to the dark side!

daily sketching part five | colourliving

daily sketching part five | colourliving

daily sketching part five | colourliving

And finally, another cityscape. A mad one, a really dense one and most colourful too. I must learn to get more straight lines:-)

daily sketching part five | colourliving

daily sketching part five | colourliving

daily sketching part five | colourliving

That’s it. We’re having a heatwave in London right now. I hope you all stay cool and for those in the southern hemisphere, hope you’re not too cold. See ya x

1 Comment

my library – personal spaces

Today I want to introduce you to a very special book in my library, entitled: Personal spaces.

I’ve always had a soft spot for books, bookbinding and therefore the London Art Book Fair. I’ve seen it go through many metamorphoses and different locations. Back in 2005 I stumbled across the most gorgeous limited edition book that had my name all over it!

Personal spaces. The book is based on a compilation of answers received from family and friends in response to a questionnaire about their homes!

my library - personal spaces

The original concept, Design & Production is by Philippa Wood. The book has been entirely hand set and therefore has a number of spelling errors. LOVE the hand stitching. It’s a limited edition of eight (hurray for me owning one) and is printed and published by The Beehive Press at the University of Lincoln.

Held in permanent collection: Artist’s Book archive, Winchester School of Art

I treasure it! Enjoy….

my library - personal spaces

my library - personal spaces

my library - personal spaces

my library - personal spaces

my library - personal spaces

my library - personal spaces

my library - personal spaces

my library - personal spaces

my library - personal spaces

my library - personal spaces

my library - personal spaces

As a designer and home finder this beauty of a book is of constant inspiration to me. Happy new week everyone x

1 Comment

urbanjunglebloggers – make your plant pop!

Today features another Urban Jungle Bloggers edition, the last one before the summer break.

Urban Jungle Bloggers is a monthly series, devised by Igor and Judith. The idea is to get some green into our homes, especially for us urban folks! Every month they invite bloggers to share ideas for creating an urban jungle through styling challenges, DIYs, green tips and tricks. Every month there is a different theme on the topic. You can follow and get more urban jungle bloggers inspiration on their Pinterest boards and Facebook page.

June’s theme is: ‘plant color pop’….. make your plant pop!

Back to basics. I’ve used Magda, the Hydrangea I bought in February 2014 (for my 1st Urban Jungle Bloggers post). She lasted for a long time.

 urbanjunglebloggers – make your plant pop!

Then in October 2014 she started growing new flowers again (see here below).

 urbanjunglebloggers – make your plant pop!

This is the here and now! June 2015. Showing off Magda with her latest growth popping against colour!

 urbanjunglebloggers – make your plant pop!
Photographed on the roof terrace against glossy red card!

 urbanjunglebloggers – make your plant pop!
Photographed on the roof terrace against glossy yellow card!

 urbanjunglebloggers – make your plant pop!
Photographed inside my flat against hot pink shutters.

This is a piece of art/collage I made a few years ago. I had it flat printed on a jet printer at an approx. size of 2M x 1.5M. I thought it would be fun to take the popping against colour a step further so hung it up on my roof terrace. This is only a section of it. Staying with the flowers/plant theme.

 urbanjunglebloggers – make your plant pop!

 urbanjunglebloggers – make your plant pop!
Spot Magda!

 urbanjunglebloggers – make your plant pop!
This gives you a better idea of size!

As always, it was great fun putting this post together. Colour popping is right up my street:-) I look forward to checking out some of the other entries in this lovely community. There’s a well deserved summer break for Igor and Judith and the Urban Jungle Bloggers crew is back in September, one of my favourite month.

UJB-sidebar-greenF

16 Comments

grow london

I was really looking forward to the return of Grow London, the contemporary garden fair now in its second year. I missed it last year by a couple of days and was determined to make it this time.

Truth be told, I didn’t know what to expect. All I knew is that it’s always nice to have green inspiration. Off I went on the first day.

Right from the start I had a good feeling. There was a lovely vibe in the air.

I loved this installation by Ben Walker, here below, (BA Fine Art, Central Saint Martins College of Arts) entitled: Melon, W

 

Grow London | colourlviing

Artist’s Statement: “Melon, W (2015) is the result of a visual study of ‘In Watermelon Sugar’, the novel by Richard Brautigan. The book is a presentation of a sanitised utopia, where residents craft their houses, bridges and lives out of watermelon. When accompanied by the fog rolling over the soil, the bathtub, with its exterior enamel shell, is a further reference to the vats used to make the ‘sweet watermelon sugar’ described by Brautigan. As a vessel for water, it feeds the flowers that sprout from its core.”

Grow London | colourlviing

There were too many exhibitors and stands to mention so I’ve picked a few here.

 

Grow London | colourlviing
Botany was exhibiting as part of the Gardenista Market.

Grow London | colourlviing
Fab plant pot hangers by Eleanor Bolton, also as part of the Gardenista Market.

Grow London | colourlviing
There were succulents galore!!!

I was definitely in love with these conifers by Lime Cross Nursery.

Grow London | colourlviing

Grow London | colourlviing

Grow London | colourlviing

And of course one of the main highlights was the incredible stand design by Petersham Nurseries. They actually erected a feature garden and were offering workshops. They recently started a School of Garden Inspiration events. Why not join the slow gardening discussion at Rosewood London. As part of the Rosewood London Slow Food & Slow Living market this is a monthly series of cutting edge, thought-provoking and transformative ‘Slow Life’ and Slow Food conversations and experiences.

Grow London | colourlviing
Feature garden

These gorgeous Zinnias were floating in a bowl. Talk about colour inspiration as well as flower inspiration.

Grow London | colourlviing

I bought some lovely herbs and plants from Edible Scape and enjoyed talking to Bradley from Boma Garden Centre, where I not so long ago bought my Spider Lily from.

There’s something about plants that makes people happy and it was most evident at this successful fair. Thank you for the inspiration Grow London. Can’t wait for next year!

4 Comments

gods own junk yard

Gods Own Junk Yard has been on my ‘must see’ list for ages so I was thrilled when it finally happened. It’s fairly accessible, in the depth of Walthamstow, in an Industrial Estate.

I’m not quite sure I knew exactly what to expect, but boy was I pleasantly surprised. You will be entering a world full of neon lights, neon signage, religious icons, kitsch and the most charming outside space with urban jungle and eclectic water stream/fountain. Best of all there’s also a café with comfy seating and affordable café grub and drinks. It’s the perfect place to while away an afternoon, get inspired, take millions of photographs and hang out with friends.

But I think I should shut up now and let you see for yourselves.

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving
I think the cow says it all…

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving
If you don’t like bright lights, don’t go!

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving
You can sit down, have a drink and take it all in!

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving
Loved the religious icons

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving
LOVE!

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving
Now who wouldn’t want this sign?

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving
The outside space is like nothing you would have seen before.

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving
What a GREAT and different kind of water stream/fountain.

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving
Great Urban Jungle

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving
I’ve seen many cable drums used as outdoor tables, but none of them in pink!

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving
Inside a hut

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving
Mwah!!!!

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving
Great textures everywhere

Gods Own Junk Yard | Colourliving
Loved this stained windows.

I cannot wait to return. It’s fun, relaxing and completely mad! People have weddings and parties there and they do bespoke neon signs.Apparently that’s their core business. During the week the space is closed to the public and it’s being used for photo shoots and other commercial events. But if you’re stuck where to go on a Friday to Sunday, this is your place!

Gods Own Junk Yard
Unit 12
Ravenswood Industrial Estate
Shernhall Street
London
E17 9HQ
020 8509 0157

This post will stay live until Monday 22nd June.

8 Comments

1a hungerford road

Today I’m so chuffed to introduce you to a wonderful project: 1A Hungerford Road, an eco house with exotic front garden and green roof. I actually happened to stumble across it when I was driving past yesterday afternoon. I immediately went back home (in my neighbourhood), grabbed my camera and returned to find the most amazing and inspirational project.

It was a pleasure to meet David Matzdorf and his partner who yesterday had an open house for charity. How lucky am I to have stumbled across it. It is such an interesting project that I decided to ask David to tell you the story so you get it from the horse’s mouth.

1A Hungerford Road | Colourliving
I saw this as I drove past and just literally had to stop

1A Hungerford Road | Colourliving
Love that wooden door, the entrance to the property

What’s your background. How did you start getting interested in eco and urban jungles? When I was 21, in 1975, I was part of a group that squatted an uninhabited tenement estate in Marylebone. We formed one of the first tenants’ co-operatives, registered as a housing association and persuaded the council to sell us the estate, which ended up comprising 50 flats after we had modernised it. In 1982, the council built a new block adjacent to our flats and constructed a rather boring garden in the shared courtyard. The co-op tenants persuaded the council that we could do a better job of managing the garden. A group of co-op tenants gradually replanted the entire garden and I got involved in looking after it, which led to an RHS qualification in horticulture in the mid-90s, having in mind a career change that never happened. I ended up as the main gardener in Marylebone through the 90s. The garden is still there and still very good, although the tenants who took over after I left have changed the style somewhat.

1A Hungerford Road | Colourliving
The weather was perfect for my visit

1A Hungerford Road | Colourliving
Every nook and cranny is used up to grow some greens

When did you build the house, get planning and how did the sloped roof come about? By 1995, I was looking for a site to build a house, because I couldn’t remotely afford to buy a house or flat in central London and 20+ years of living in Marylebone had spoiled the prospect of moving to the suburbs. It took 3 years to find the site, which I bought in 1998. It was the first scrap of land that I had found where no one thought you could get planning consent for a house – thus it was inexpensive – but I reckoned differently.

The intention was always to build a sustainable house, which was somewhat less common in 1998 than it is now. That went down well with the local planning authority and overcame the inevitable petition that was submitted in opposition to my planning application. The green roof was always part of the plan. Aside from its eco-credentials and its value in combating the petition, it also doubles the size of my garden. I had become accustomed to messing about in a communal garden 45m x 30m. Here, my entire scrap of land is 15m x 12m, including the footprint of the house. The more garden I could scrape together, the better. The green roof also has the challenging side-effect of giving me two totally different environments in which to experiment with plants.

The curve of the roof was a response to planning restrictions, as indeed are most of the peculiarities of the house. The planners mandated a set-back of 5m from the street and my entire plot is less than 12m deep, so perforce I have a wide, flat house, built precisely to the land boundaries at the rear and both flanks, with a wide-, flat garden to the front and a green roof on top. The planners also restricted the height of the house to 1 storey at the Northeast end, to avoid overshadowing the garden of the adjacent house. The curved monopitch roof  was a strategy that achieved maximum height in the middle, but still got down to the required height at the end.

Planning consent was granted in October 1998. Piled foundations were constructed in Spring 1999.  The main construction contract occupied the rest of 1999 and 2000. I moved in at the end of June 2000 and the house was finally completed in May 2001.

1A Hungerford Road | Colourliving
How stunning are these Zantedeschia Aethiopica?

Your love for plants is evident. How does one start an urban jungle and sloped roof full of greens? That’s an unanswerable question. The following all help: a qualification in horticulture, not being too precious when experimental plants expire after a cold winter or a dry summer, a great deal of patience, an eye for unlikely plant combinations and a focus on a garden as a venture in place-making and habitat-creating, rather than an exercise in competitive housekeeping.

It’s important that you are seeing the green roof after fifteen years of continuous experimentation. I’ve made many of the mistakes by now and their evidence is long-since faded. You saw some of the residual mistakes: the two varieties of invasive grasses, the daftness of a strip of gravel at the top of the access ladder and some ineradicable weeds. But most of the balls-ups have happened already and I have outlasted them.

The key period was around 2004-2007. That’s when I realised that I could grow a lot of really quite big plants in shallow soil, having semi-stumbled in the combination of a minimalist irrigation system and no fertiliser. Most specifications for green roofs, other than  the bog-standard Sedum mats, involve fertilising regimens and no irrigation, which constitutes a recipe for grasses and other weeds to take over. I do the opposite: the choice plants get irrigated before they die, but the grasses and weeds do not get the fertiliser that enables them to take over.

1A Hungerford Road | Colourliving
Look at these orange Abutilon

How do you choose your plants and where do you source them from? Anything that is drought-resistant and has  chance of coping with shallow soil will get a go. I do a lot of swaps, sourcing unusual/rare plants with people on internet forums, especially the one I co-run at Growing on the Edge. Sometimes I’ll see perfectly common garden species at a local garden centre such as Boma garden centre and will buy a few small, inexpensive plants to experiment with.

Until the financial crash, there were several specialist suppliers of unusual and exotic plants in England, but most of them failed after people no longer had the money to indulge their desires – combined with three successive hard winters between 2008 and 2011. There are still a few left, but they tend to focus on large specimen plants for super-rich people who want an instant garden. That’s not what I do.

1A Hungerford Road | Colourliving
Some more Abutilon

What’s the biggest challenge in having an eco house and walled exotic garden? Staying healthy enough to look after them as you get older.

1A Hungerford Road | Colourliving
Is this a Foxglove? Who can help out. Am sure David can!

Any tips how you keep your plants alive and get them to thrive? There’s no substitute for a proper college course in horticulture. I did my RHS certificate at Capel Manor college in the 90s and every move I make is informed by the basic botany, genetics, soil science, pruning techniques, composting practices and plant biology that I learned then. That and actually spending time in amongst your plants, observing them quietly and drawing conclusions about why they look good, bad, healthy or unhealthy.

1A Hungerford Road | Colourliving
Part of the wonderful exotic front garden. Look at the red wall section and you’ll spot the 9o degree ladder to the green roof. DON’T ASK!

Can you tell us a little bit about the National Gardens Scheme? Not much that you cannot glean from their website. They have been, for many years, the Great and the Good doing Charitable Works and they have been gradually dragging themselves, with increasingly effective good intentions, into the 21c. world of diverse London. Last year their annual formal reception was held at Broadwater Farm community garden in Tottenham. That was profoundly important for them and it was great success. Upmarket garden owners from all over London trekked up to a notorious council estate in N17 and some of them were able to learn from the local gardeners. The NGS deserves a great deal of credit for this, but it was not before time.

1A Hungerford Road | Colourliving
Can you see David who just got up the ladder and is walking up the sloped roof.

You run an international forum for exotic gardening enthusiasts. Can you expand? We can be found here.

In the first years of the century, the whole “exotic gardening” movement or craze (choose whichever word you prefer) used to commune and share information and experiences on Essex garden designer Paul Spracklin’s “UK Oasis” website. In 2007, he suddenly decided to stop running it and I contacted scores of his members to say that we desperately needed a replacement. Australia-based English horticulturist Peter Richardson did most of the website design, but for the past 5-6 years, the site has been run by me in London and Kev Spence in Loughborough Leics.

We have about 1400 members worldwide, including some pretty serious plant-hunters and suppliers, people who run well-known exotic gardens in places like Cornwall, Gloucestershire, Cork and Kerry, international experts on Tree-ferns, rare Palms, Aroids, Agaves & Yuccas, Japanese Orchids, Aloes and other types of plants. I’m a moderator, a site admin and the “green roof guy”.

The theme is basically: growing things where one might not expect them to be able to grow. Pushing the envelope. It’s an English-language forum, but as well as members in the UK, various regions of America, Australia, Ireland, New Zealand and South Africa, we also have contributors in France, Italy, Germany, Portugal, Madeira, Spain, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Ukraine, Philippines, Brazil, Japan and China.

1A Hungerford Road | Colourliving
On the green roof

1A Hungerford Road | Colourliving
The green roof

1A Hungerford Road | Colourliving
The green roof

1A Hungerford Road | Colourliving
The green roof

I also fell in love with the house and although I was awarded entry there just wasn’t any time to take pictures and show you how wonderful the inside it. When I mentioned to David that the inside has nearly got as many plants as outside, he said that if there’s a shelf anywhere, a plant will find a way on it.

I have to thank David for his generosity of answering my questions late last night and for being such a great host. I hope he will let me come back and take pictures of the inside of the house. Thank you for the inspiration David.

This post will stay live until Monday 15th June.

15 Comments

salumeria lamuri in berlin

Another of my hot finds in Berlin is the charming Salumeria Lamuri in Berlin.

salumeria lamuri in berlin | colourliving

salumeria lamuri in berlin | colourliving

The very first thing you notice is the beautiful tiling. Originally this place used to be a butcher. I love that there are different tiles, a real mish mash.

salumeria lamuri in berlin | colourliving

salumeria lamuri in berlin | colourliving

Salumeria Lamuri is everything from an Italian coffee bar to a bistro and delicatessen. You can start with breakfast, choose from croissant, muesli with yoghurt, cheese platter or scrambled eggs. I had the eggs and lovely mint tea. For lunch there are panini, salads, pasta and more. Dinner has it’s own menu and a lot depends what the chef feels like cooking. All of it looks and sounds utterly delicious and is authentically Italian. .

salumeria lamuri in berlin | colourliving

Let’s not forget the cakes.

salumeria lamuri in berlin | colourliving

There’s seating in the front but there’s also seating at the back where it reminds me of a trattoria in rural Italy.

salumeria lamuri in berlin | colourliving

salumeria lamuri in berlin | colourliving

I loved everything about this place and am looking forward to return as soon as I can for a spot of dinner. Sitting there made me feel I’m in Italy and not in Berlin. If you find yourself near Kreuzberg, do go and see for yourself. You’ll thank me.

Salumeria Lamuri
Köpenicker Straße 183
10997 Berlin (Kreuzberg)
6 Comments

shining a light on at {mine}

Happy new week. Happy 1st June and hello summer. Today I would like to shine a light on at {mine}, a London based platform and online community for home, design and interiors lovers.

Founded by Ia Bergman and Helena Benelbas, the mission is to have an online community where we can show parts of our abodes, share the content and source, peek into other community member’s homes and interact with like-minded folks. What’s refreshing is that it’s for ‘real’ people with ‘real’ homes.

at{mine} launched in private beta in 2014 and I have been a member since practically the beginning. There have been many changes along the way but spring saw the launch of the updated website. The new site has far greater functionality. For example, there’s a sleek overview of all available categories so you can select what is of interest to you.

shining a light on at {mine} | colourliving

So how does it work? Well, you set up your account, upload pictures, tag products in your pictures and simultaneously link to the source. You choose the category it’s under and do a little story telling. Boom, then it goes live. Like with any community, do look around, do like other member’s pictures, comment on them and do follow the ones that inspire you. (making a mental note to myself to be more active in the community).  There’s also a feature for you to add items you’ve seen and might want to your own wish list. It can really become a one-stop gap for all your interior desires and needs.

shining a light on at {mine} | colourliving
at {Tina Bernstein} | detail of my profile page, showing some of my uploaded pictures

Like with any good online platform that wants to succeed in this digital age, at{mine}’s interface is user friendly and stylish. It’s easy to navigate and best of all they’re now fully mobile friendly so you can upload photos and interact with the online community from wherever you are.

shining a light on at {mine} | colourliving
Left: detail of my profile page | Right: a vignette in my living room

I really enjoy popping in, uploading a new photo and looking around for inspiration from my fellow members.

shining a light on at {mine} | colourliving
A vignette in my living room

So if you’re an interior design blogger, an interior designer or simply in love with design and your home, this platform is for you.  Or maybe you are a brand that would like to interact with this community, so why not join?

I have it on good authority that at{mine} is to publicly launch in early June. You can join right now while still in beta and familiarise yourself with the platform before the launch rush. The good people of at{mine} kindly gave me a special invite code for my readers.

See you in there!

8 Comments

rhs chelsea flower show

It’s such a treat to visit The Chelsea Flower Show.

My friend John gifted me his ticket as he was unable to go. So, off I went last Wednesday afternoon. The weather was superb and the crowds were in full force. I had decided to plan my visit but that all went out of the window. Next best thing was to just follow my nose.

Here’s the map of the entire Chelsea Flower Show. It’s massive. I arrived at 6pm so only had a couple of hours until it closed.

rhs chelsea flower show - colourliving

Here are some of my favourite exhibits. Hope you enjoy them.

rhs chelsea flower show - colourliving
Floristry. Celebrating 150 years of Alice in Wonderland

There were some outstanding displays, but this exhibit by Hadlow College Floristry, which won a gold medal, was incredible. Look at the leaves on the teapot and that array of bold coloured flowers representing a stream of tea was just so inspiring.

rhs chelsea flower show - colourliving

rhs chelsea flower show - colourliving

There were flower bouquets galore but this made out of peonies caught my eye. The colours, just so beautiful and vibrant.

rhs chelsea flower show - colourliving

One of the most interesting projects was The New Craftsmen Artisan Retreats. They erected six sheds, each one showing off one of their makers, who brought different aspects of their craft practices to life.

rhs chelsea flower show - colourliving
The picnic tables in the middle of the sheds

rhs chelsea flower show - colourliving
Magical ladders swaying in the trees

rhs chelsea flower show - colourliving
Katherine May, one of the artisans, dyed these beautiful fabrics with Hyacinth and Cochineal

rhs chelsea flower show - colourliving
Macramé pot-hanger by Gina Marris

rhs chelsea flower show - colourliving
Peony

rhs chelsea flower show - colourliving
Michael Ruh crafts vessels and vases of hand-blown glass. Choose your colour and size

rhs chelsea flower show - colourliving
Here are the stunning vases.

Edo Garden by Ishihara Kazuyuki Design Laboratory was breathtaking and won a gold medal. Nearly impossible to photograph, for it was rammed with people, it was a much needed oasis and respite from the loud music and hoards of visitors.

rhs chelsea flower show - colourliving
The water stream was soothing

rhs chelsea flower show - colourliving

rhs chelsea flower show - colourliving
How beautiful is the little garden house?

rhs chelsea flower show - colourliving
The colours of the various trees were just majestic

Another favourite was the National Chrysanthemum Society’s display where they used the pallet of colours of the Chrysanthemum to mimic the varying colours and flavours of ice cream. They showcased them in a cone, Knickerbocker Glory and tubs. A genius idea which also got a gold medal.

rhs chelsea flower show - colourliving
an amazing display

rhs chelsea flower show - colourliving
Anyone for Apricot flavoured ice cream?

rhs chelsea flower show - colourliving
Or pink grapefruit?

rhs chelsea flower show - colourliving
Or blueberry?

There was so much more to see, but so little time. The Chelsea Flower Show ended on Saturday evening. I cannot wait for next year!

This post will stay live till Monday 1st June.

10 Comments

urban jungle bloggers – show your plant gang

I saw on Twitter on Tuesday that people were ready for their Urban Jungle Bloggers post! How did that happen? I could have sworn it was for next week.

Urban Jungle Bloggers is a monthly series, devised by Igor and Judith. The idea is to get some green into our homes, especially for us urban folks! Every month they invite bloggers from all over the world to share ideas for creating an urban jungle through styling challenges, DIYs, green tips and tricks. Every month there is a different theme on the topic. You can follow and get more Urban Jungle Bloggers inspiration on their Pinterest boards and Facebook page.

May’s theme is: ‘show your plant gang’…..

OK, with limited time I had to carve out a slot when there aren’t any hailstones coming down. I thought it would be fun to photograph some of the gang on la terrace!

urban jungle bloggers - show your plant gang - colourliving
Here’s the gang!

It was nice to take my DIY Kokedama’s outside for this little photo shoot.

urban jungle bloggers - show your plant gang - colourliving

My Budda is making sure all is well on the roof terrace. I can’t wait for my herb garden to properly start growing and to grow tomatoes next month.

urban jungle bloggers - show your plant gang - colourliving

Mr Turtle is keeping everyone a bit of company. Everything is starting to grow, but we did have hailstones a few days ago which isn’t good for the plants.

urban jungle bloggers - show your plant gang - colourliving

I’m not sure of the name of this little tree. I bought it last year and it’s doing well.

urban jungle bloggers - show your plant gang - colourliving

Here’s Magda, my beautiful Hydrangea. Again, she’s starting to bloom. Looking forward to the different colour changes.

urban jungle bloggers - show your plant gang - colourliving

I look forward to inspecting the other plant gangs:-) On Monday I will show you some of the beauties I found at the Chelsea Flower Show. Meanwhile, have a wonderful weekend. For those in the UK, enjoy the extra day.

UJB-sidebar-greenF

 

 

21 Comments